Archive for the 'Meola Creek Waititiko' Category

Plant species for Meola Creek

November 11th, 2017

STEPS has worked with Council Biodiversity, Wildlands and other experts over the years.  We have developed starter plant lists of  ‘naturally occurring’ species for three habitats which occur along Meola Creek:

  • Lava Rock forest
  • Stream side planting
  • Wetland planting

These lists are useful for community plantings and for site re-instatement as improvements take place in the catchment. Thanks to Nick Goldwater and Sel Arbuckle for plant lists.  Below is a photo taken by Roy Clements of a wetland community planting.

Planting the STEPS Wetland May 2009

Rock Forest planting schedule FoM STEPS plant lists- wetland and streamside (riparian)

Auckland Lava Rock Forest plant list (from Friends of Maungawhau – first published in their book: Maungawhau – a Short History of Volunteer Action 2014)

Plan for Meola & Motions Creeks and Volcanic Aquifer

October 1st, 2017

 Te Tatua-a-Riukiuta Aquifer and the Waititiko – Waiateao Creeks

Inspired by the commitment of the Puketapapa Local Board to Te Auanga Oakley Creek, we joined with the Weona walkway community group and approached Albert Eden Local Board regarding protection and enhancement of Meola and Motions Creeks. We  proposed that the AELB annual plan include a vision for  both creeks, for Council and Community groups to work towards. We have asked Puketapapa and Waitemata Boards also to contribute as key landmarks such as Te Tokaroa Meola Reef, Western Springs and Three Kings all play a major role in the Meola-Motions natural landscape.

Our catchments our the largest on the isthmus and have many different communities of interest.  Both streams have poor water quality.  Over centuries they have been cut up 

by public works including national roads and other infrastructure; stormwater and wastewater from whole suburbs disappears,  surfacing several kilometres away in local parks like Kerr Taylor reserve. The map shows Motions and Meola catchments in yellow, and the underlying aquifer in pink.

We are entering a time of great change with a $1 billion central Interceptor and Chamberlain Park projects causing landscape changes.  We feel the community needs a ‘big picture’, partly to provide a background for the community work between Watercare and Meola Forum on Meola catchment changes from Central Interceptor. We also felt it could boost recognition of the need for a (formal and informal) mountain to sea path way to connect communities for cyclists and walkers.

Here is our draft plan.  Please read it and let us know what you would add or change. We welcome your input.  Waititiko – Waiateao Vision

[Contributing Authors: Jeanette Budgett (Unitec Institute of Technology), Sandra Anderson (University of Auckland). With thanks for contributions from Sharon Eccleshall, Andrew Mackintosh, Nick Goldwater and others.]

We look forward to progressing this plan and vision for the community.

Meola Creek and stormwater

September 22nd, 2017

With renewed awareness about the issues of urban stormwater in Auckland STEPS has been busy walking people through Roy Clements Treeway and Kerr Taylor Reserve.

Here Pat Prescott and Councillor Cathy Casey are shown walking along the boardwalk.

We were delighted with the diligent follow up from Councillor Casey and council officers about some of the improvements that need to be made.

Councillor Casey later followed up with a question to the Healthy Waters team (Auckland Council) about multi lingual signs pointing out the dangers of beaches and creeks subject to overflows of sewage and heavy metals.  STEPS is very concerned about non-English speakers who collect and wash wild green vegetables in Meola Creek.

We thank Councillor Casey, along with others who are asking about STEPS’ work and the state of Meola Creek in 2017.

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